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Lerato Scribess Sibanda

Lerato Scribess Sibanda - Power.Passion. Purpose - I am a writer, academic and spoken word artist -- http://beautybeginswithbe.blogspot.com/

See the Kink in my Hair!

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So the other day in Ga-rankuwa while in one of the local taxis the driver went on a really intense vent as to how mzansi chicks have sold out to the weave i.e. bonding i.e. plastic hair i.e. fake hair. Talk about seriouuuuus hair politics…If memory serves me well this driver boldly went on to spurn a derogatory comment as to how Nigerian men have invaded Mzansi shores with their drugs while the women on the other hand brought their weaves. Haha word I couldn’t make up my mind if this dude had beef with Nigerians, with our local women or with weaves. Maybe it’s with all of the above! Talk about hair shenanigans, all I could do was cackle nervously and quietly thank the fashion gods for inspiring me to embrace the kink in my hair and to grow my afro i.e. ethnic hair i.e. nappy hair i.e. kaffir hare. But as the agro driver grew more agro complaining about how much weaves cost and how his girlfriend always demands this much and that much for the latest weave and yada- yada -yada -yada, I sank deeper and deeper into guilt as I had been contemplating buying myself some Indian or Brazilian locks for a while. Recent hype in the media about the significance of hair amongst the black population has had me racking my mind and asking: what is the big deal with hair anyway, especially amongst black people? Hair politics is emerging as its own branch of study in popular culture theory…Word! Well whatever the deal with hair is, it stands that whether you go ethnic or plastic; hair goes a long way in the art of titivation hence the inspiration for such idioms as: “I am having a bad hair day” and “you’re getting in my hair”. In the words of some inspired sistah on some blog, ‘hair has become a religion especially if you’re a black woman you can conceivably, depending on how much you worship hair, spend half your life in the beauty salon…’ But hey whose complaining?

ETHNIC HAIR

The “Make Love not War” era of the 60s (Rock n roll baby!) had hippies on the streets of Harlem, of Soweto or of the African Diaspora growing fros and walking around with afro combs lodged in the hair clad in bell bottoms and colourful shirts. It must have been the ish times for the Afro! But with time the fro lost its mojo and black peeps started to straighten and curl their hair: perming, relaxing and blowing were regarded as fashionable and natural hair as not. Cut to the 90s a new brand of an eclectic brand of Afrocentrism emerged with the likes of Lauryn Hill epitomizing locks and Lenny Kravitz rocking the Fro, and ethnic hair was no longer denounced as ugly, primitive or awkward. In the 2000s this brand of Afrocentrism has grown extensively and found voice in a variety of ethnic hairstyles and so today the myth that ethnic hair is too stubborn too be managed, styled or maintained has been squashed. Hair products have been created for black hair and many salons have seen the niche for ethnic hair; think of the success of Jabu Stone salons in recent years. Kinky black is beautiful and has an aesthetic quality of its own that can posit it as truly “fashionable”. Check out these kinks worn by some sistahs in the entertainment history and tell me if black hair has not found its voice. Word!

Solange Knowles rocking the Afro or “fro”

Local chick Pabi Moloi in classic bald ot “Chiskop”

Precious Kofi rocking a variation of cornrows

Alek Wek looking simply beautiful in relaxed or ”retouched” Black Hair

Miss Alicia Keys alluring in cornrows plus weave

Check out true African finesse from Mzansi’s hot property Lira

Soul Sistah Erykah Badu in Dreadlocks/ Dreads or just “Locks”

______________

Check out the next article on the trendiest weaves as well as the places to buy, borrow or steal yourself some of that crazy ish . Word!

I Am Not My Hair (India Arie)

Little girl with the press and curl
Age eight I got a Jheri curl
Thirteen I got a relaxer
I was a source of so much laughter
At fifteen when it all broke off
Eighteen and went all natural
February two thousand and two
I went and did
What I had to do
Because it was time to change my life
To become the women that I am inside
Ninety-seven dreadlock all gone
I looked in the mirror
For the first time and saw that HEY….

[Chorus]
I am not my hair
I am not this skin
I am not your expectations no no
I am not my hair
I ma not this skin
I am a soul that lives within

Good hair means curls and waves
Bad hair means you look like a slave
At the turn of the century
Its time for us to redefine who we be
You can shave it off
Like a South African beauty
Or get in on lock
Like Bob Marley
You can rock it straight
Like Oprah Winfrey
If its not what’s on your head
Its what’s underneath and say HEY….

[Chorus]
I am not my hair
I am not this skin
I am not your expectations no no
I am not my hair
I ma not this skin
I am a soul that lives within…

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See the Kink in my Hair!, 7.6 out of 10 based on 5 ratings
  • I think this one is a really great post today.

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  • Bongi

    You kno when I first read this article, I refrained frm commemting…… Mainly because there was so much going around in ma head at the time…. I had a full head og locks for a good 10 years…. Just recently I choose to change my look… My daughter of 13 has only ever known her mom with locks; was in tears when I came back frm hairdressers…. Then I read this article; I started wondering: Did I make a mistake??? ‘Good God; am I gon have to sew my locks back on’ I was thinking…. But u kno what??? Nooo; I’ve made this change for me…. Not coz I was selling out: I did fit in better with the Europeans with my long locks…. Dat was not enough for me…. I’d neva wear a weave; purely becoz I’m not a girly girl…. I still say; Long Live Freedom of choice!!!! You choose to go blonde?? I take ma hat off for u coz that is one bold move I wish I could make…. *smiles* Thanx Rato 4 inspiring to look deeper into our choices; Hopefully it doesn’t just stop with hair…. Love and Light*

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  • Angeline

    Good Work Lerato!!!

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  • PUNKDASSIE

    CHANA I AGREE……. BUT YET AGAIN SO MANY WOMAN LOOK SO MUCH BETA WITH THE FAKE HAIR. GIVES YOU A SENSE OF EXPRESSION AND FLARE.

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  • ndulumamwaba

    I defer to your views as my own; truly I say, yours dear lerato, is an exquisite mind. May the dance never stop till truth, if only attainable in absolute terms, rests in your hands…

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  • Hey Nduluma I like that you are a critical thinker always ready to pique at pple’s minds and have your own piqued at. Your comments have inspired and also challenged me in my thinking, and from this I have have a few thoughts of my own to share…

    Indeed at times in the quest to probe and/or to educate others we writers tend to be extremists in overturning what is supposedly “oppressive” to the point of being blindsighted ourselves; and, once we are possessed by our intellectual ideas we easily de-generate into narrowmindedness.I concur… who is to say that if a chick is sporting a weave than it means that she has sold out to imperialist notions of white supremacy; or even, that she has no unique self-identity? If I, Lerato (so-called soul sistah that I am) would abandon my afro today would I have suddenly renounced my race or “conformed”? I tell you the quest to uncover identity is at times mere folly yet we sociologists have the natural inclination to ask what has never been asked and to look for holes; an in this many have been found…

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  • nduluma mwaba

    @ Lerato – I definitely hear what you say and absolutely agree with you. The issue is both relevant and critical; we certainly have to probe and question these ideological threads that bind us and largely leave us at the mercy of eurocentric ideas. I guess I wonder if this drive should be set on a mass scale or must be directed at the individual. By and large the revolutionary will advocate for an evolution of social consciousness for the black mind on a large scale; almost as if until women stop the perm, or abandon the weave, or ditch the wig, they are not free and are still in some kind of mental slavery! I think I do not buy into this fundamentalist view. Quite simply, as you have been doing, the premise should be education and hopefully it will translate into informed choice and empowerment as opposed to riding the ignoramous wave. The individual is central, so that if the choice is to continue looking western or rather consistent with eurocentric ideas of beauty then it is her choice, and not because she is weak or fake or any of those kinds of notions some afrocentrists easily pin on black women that choose to look’unafrican’.

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  • @ Nduluma ~ thnx for sharing your viewpoints as far as the issue of hair politicking is concerned. Tis true that this issue is subliminal to that Black consciousness and and the Black renaissance but not to no effect. This is must of the plight of black people: to probe and question the ideologies that bind them (us), that instruct us, and that inform our being. And why is this? Well it’s simple…it’s because we as Africans have been anhilated by dominant socio-political metanarratives that society is hinged upon. In the words of Homi Bhanha the black imaginary remains in this postmodern age “guttered”. We cannot pretend otherwise black identity has been influenced by a whole lot of “bully” ideas and notions which are mostly eurocentric…

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  • nduluma mwaba

    I have observed however, that women have image issues tied intimately to self esteem and beauty, that are fundamentally linked to their hair.So it cannot be a simple and dismissable topic, because we cannot afford to have our beautiful black women walking around feeling shortchanged, disillusioned and inadequate-that state creates bitter women who then engender bitterness and irritation in their men, and while its not about us as men, we surely cannot have this unnerving situation fester at our doorsteps!lol! Black Women must become confident, not in a pretentious and superficial way, but rather realise that the intention for their look should not be to bag a man. If thats your intention you will never compete against the most ‘weaved up’ because men too watch television and know whats ‘hot’.If you decide to go kinky, play to your strengths and dont hope that we will say ‘beautiful african queen’ even if you look like a black Amy whinehouse (coz infact she’s full of WINE). Look good and feel good. Personally a woman’s character, consistency and originality are infinitely more sexy than the huchee mama on the street with multiple award winning weaves obscuring her natural look; the additional problem that absolutely infuriates me is that seemingly when women are ‘weaved up’ there’s a particular invented personlaity they tend to adopt which is quite frighteningly alien to the sistahood – they’d have attitude, walk funny, be all fake and uninspiring. They’d be staving off like the whole world wants them – a dime a dozen in sunnyside man!!I dont know if you feel me…just keeping it real

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  • nduluma mwaba

    To be earnest, the debate around black hair is essentially no different to the extended debate around black renaissance and consciousness in general and in modern times. The protracted catharsis has to do with recapturing value, identity, uniqueness and maybe more ambitiously meaning and significance in all we do as a people. Now thats quite a burden to a modern freethinker; we cannot undo our past influences and we cannot always explain ourselves away as far as our choices and perhaps habits. The power of individual choice must not be subjected to the intellectual’s version which has to do with finding deep philosophical dimensions around aesthetics, even though I am all for ‘education of the black mind’. I do not seek for levels of sheer subliminal messaging or social commentaries encoded in women’s hair, beyond the fact of a womans hairpiece enhancing her beauty or diminishing and taxing it, I cannot extract much more presuppositions as to whether she is doing so with knowlege of the black hair history or an awareness and presence of mind about her intended outcomes.I truly think that as fads typically behave, coutoure and fashion aesthetics constantly reinvent themselves and claim a life of their own: I can bet you a million bucks that B A barackus had no idea that the mowhog he sported back in the day would grow into the world wide phenomenon that it is today, 2 million that in a year another kickbutt fad will take its place….viva individual choice. Be sober and sound, but a little innocent indulgence is no crime

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  • ahhh, hair ne… yesterday after readin dis article the wifey said,”Matt, i’m getting a weave…” now if de’s anyone in de world (other than khaya)who knws how i feel bout hair, it’s my wife… she was jokin ofcourse,but i remembered when my dislike for ‘fake’ hair turned to disgust and then back 2 jus dislike (i’m sitting on tolerate ryt now) Khaya borrowed me a book (which i have since ordered) called Black Beauty by Ben Arogondade.
    an intense view n history on black aesthetics. now dat i understand the history, i am content in saying, blak ppl will do a lot of ‘bad’ in ignorance and less ‘right’ out of perfect choice (no pun intended). if we only knew where it started n why we hate ourselves so much, “I am not my hair” would be turned to, “My hair IS because I AM.” The outer mirrors the inner.

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  • Trevisto

    I also grew up with the mindset that natural hair is unfashionable, ugly,
    primitive and awkward, my sisters always had to relax their hair to look hot, so Nicky, I then thought long relaxed hair or weave is hot. but trust me I find Lira super hot!!

    I can’t stand the smell of Dark ‘n Lovely moisturiser, the grease. eeuw! the smell of blow dried weave!!

    I agree choose whatever that works for you, but I’m happy and proud because people like Pabi have change the mindsets that going bald and short natural hair means u can’t afford exotic hairstyles or you are not fashionable.

    Then the Bonangs, the Beyonces, the Tyra banks of this country can stop looking down on the Liras and Pabi Molois of this country.

    great article!

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  • Bo

    I think I’ve done it all as far as hair goes and truth be told I’m really sick of weaves. I’ve done them all have since come to the realization that they’re a short term solution to a long term problem.I’m starting to find short hairdo’s really attractive (think Nikiwe Bikitjha from eNews,Wandi from Rythmn City,etc).In my opinion that kind of short hair creates a very mature,confident ‘you better take me seriously’ but also sexy kind of look..I absolutely love it!!!

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  • Kagiso ‘KG’

    1st & foremost, i love the article, Lerry, it got me really thinkin as to how i really see myself in relation to my hair vs how people see me in relation to my hair. I think wat im gettin here is that how other people view me or my hairstyle, should not affect my self-esteem. Thanks 🙂

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  • I agree Khaya that our choice of hairstyles is our own to make and one’s ‘right to self-determinism’ and that is all good and well.I also agree with the article in that there may be some hegemony surrounding the choice of hairstyles that (black) sistahs or even brothers opt for. I as a chick have seen how guys generally go for the girl with the long hair which -if the chick is black -happens to be a weave most of the time coz let’s face it black sistahs hair doesn’t grow to an incredible length and is not flouncy (even though we’d like to think that it is). So sometimes our choice of hairstlyle is not self-determined but determined rather by the pressures of our modern society.

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  • khaya

    The hair politics of black people’s are ones that i have particular interest in.for the longest time natural hair of black folk was percieved as a deflaut disaster that had to be civilised into a correct form and that is where the black consciousness movements were able to,through the growing of natural hair,give an alternative to what was the norm.we have come along way from those days and i would like to think that those who are said to be ‘selling out’ have a right of self determinism and their choices ought to be respected.we cant run away from the fact that our dress codes and hair dos are statements even if the said statements dont necessarily compliment or reflect our mind states or ideologies.thats the unfortunate part of doing things for the sake of doing because at times you may be quizzed of the meaning of what is hair seeks to communicate,if ever there is anything.your hair is yours and do as you see fit.

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  • I think this one is a really great post today.

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  • Bongi

    You kno when I first read this article, I refrained frm commemting…… Mainly because there was so much going around in ma head at the time…. I had a full head og locks for a good 10 years…. Just recently I choose to change my look… My daughter of 13 has only ever known her mom with locks; was in tears when I came back frm hairdressers…. Then I read this article; I started wondering: Did I make a mistake??? ‘Good God; am I gon have to sew my locks back on’ I was thinking…. But u kno what??? Nooo; I’ve made this change for me…. Not coz I was selling out: I did fit in better with the Europeans with my long locks…. Dat was not enough for me…. I’d neva wear a weave; purely becoz I’m not a girly girl…. I still say; Long Live Freedom of choice!!!! You choose to go blonde?? I take ma hat off for u coz that is one bold move I wish I could make…. *smiles* Thanx Rato 4 inspiring to look deeper into our choices; Hopefully it doesn’t just stop with hair…. Love and Light*

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
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  • Angeline

    Good Work Lerato!!!

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  • PUNKDASSIE

    CHANA I AGREE……. BUT YET AGAIN SO MANY WOMAN LOOK SO MUCH BETA WITH THE FAKE HAIR. GIVES YOU A SENSE OF EXPRESSION AND FLARE.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
  • ndulumamwaba

    I defer to your views as my own; truly I say, yours dear lerato, is an exquisite mind. May the dance never stop till truth, if only attainable in absolute terms, rests in your hands…

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
  • Hey Nduluma I like that you are a critical thinker always ready to pique at pple’s minds and have your own piqued at. Your comments have inspired and also challenged me in my thinking, and from this I have have a few thoughts of my own to share…

    Indeed at times in the quest to probe and/or to educate others we writers tend to be extremists in overturning what is supposedly “oppressive” to the point of being blindsighted ourselves; and, once we are possessed by our intellectual ideas we easily de-generate into narrowmindedness.I concur… who is to say that if a chick is sporting a weave than it means that she has sold out to imperialist notions of white supremacy; or even, that she has no unique self-identity? If I, Lerato (so-called soul sistah that I am) would abandon my afro today would I have suddenly renounced my race or “conformed”? I tell you the quest to uncover identity is at times mere folly yet we sociologists have the natural inclination to ask what has never been asked and to look for holes; an in this many have been found…

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
  • nduluma mwaba

    @ Lerato – I definitely hear what you say and absolutely agree with you. The issue is both relevant and critical; we certainly have to probe and question these ideological threads that bind us and largely leave us at the mercy of eurocentric ideas. I guess I wonder if this drive should be set on a mass scale or must be directed at the individual. By and large the revolutionary will advocate for an evolution of social consciousness for the black mind on a large scale; almost as if until women stop the perm, or abandon the weave, or ditch the wig, they are not free and are still in some kind of mental slavery! I think I do not buy into this fundamentalist view. Quite simply, as you have been doing, the premise should be education and hopefully it will translate into informed choice and empowerment as opposed to riding the ignoramous wave. The individual is central, so that if the choice is to continue looking western or rather consistent with eurocentric ideas of beauty then it is her choice, and not because she is weak or fake or any of those kinds of notions some afrocentrists easily pin on black women that choose to look’unafrican’.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
  • @ Nduluma ~ thnx for sharing your viewpoints as far as the issue of hair politicking is concerned. Tis true that this issue is subliminal to that Black consciousness and and the Black renaissance but not to no effect. This is must of the plight of black people: to probe and question the ideologies that bind them (us), that instruct us, and that inform our being. And why is this? Well it’s simple…it’s because we as Africans have been anhilated by dominant socio-political metanarratives that society is hinged upon. In the words of Homi Bhanha the black imaginary remains in this postmodern age “guttered”. We cannot pretend otherwise black identity has been influenced by a whole lot of “bully” ideas and notions which are mostly eurocentric…

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
  • nduluma mwaba

    I have observed however, that women have image issues tied intimately to self esteem and beauty, that are fundamentally linked to their hair.So it cannot be a simple and dismissable topic, because we cannot afford to have our beautiful black women walking around feeling shortchanged, disillusioned and inadequate-that state creates bitter women who then engender bitterness and irritation in their men, and while its not about us as men, we surely cannot have this unnerving situation fester at our doorsteps!lol! Black Women must become confident, not in a pretentious and superficial way, but rather realise that the intention for their look should not be to bag a man. If thats your intention you will never compete against the most ‘weaved up’ because men too watch television and know whats ‘hot’.If you decide to go kinky, play to your strengths and dont hope that we will say ‘beautiful african queen’ even if you look like a black Amy whinehouse (coz infact she’s full of WINE). Look good and feel good. Personally a woman’s character, consistency and originality are infinitely more sexy than the huchee mama on the street with multiple award winning weaves obscuring her natural look; the additional problem that absolutely infuriates me is that seemingly when women are ‘weaved up’ there’s a particular invented personlaity they tend to adopt which is quite frighteningly alien to the sistahood – they’d have attitude, walk funny, be all fake and uninspiring. They’d be staving off like the whole world wants them – a dime a dozen in sunnyside man!!I dont know if you feel me…just keeping it real

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
  • nduluma mwaba

    To be earnest, the debate around black hair is essentially no different to the extended debate around black renaissance and consciousness in general and in modern times. The protracted catharsis has to do with recapturing value, identity, uniqueness and maybe more ambitiously meaning and significance in all we do as a people. Now thats quite a burden to a modern freethinker; we cannot undo our past influences and we cannot always explain ourselves away as far as our choices and perhaps habits. The power of individual choice must not be subjected to the intellectual’s version which has to do with finding deep philosophical dimensions around aesthetics, even though I am all for ‘education of the black mind’. I do not seek for levels of sheer subliminal messaging or social commentaries encoded in women’s hair, beyond the fact of a womans hairpiece enhancing her beauty or diminishing and taxing it, I cannot extract much more presuppositions as to whether she is doing so with knowlege of the black hair history or an awareness and presence of mind about her intended outcomes.I truly think that as fads typically behave, coutoure and fashion aesthetics constantly reinvent themselves and claim a life of their own: I can bet you a million bucks that B A barackus had no idea that the mowhog he sported back in the day would grow into the world wide phenomenon that it is today, 2 million that in a year another kickbutt fad will take its place….viva individual choice. Be sober and sound, but a little innocent indulgence is no crime

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)
  • ahhh, hair ne… yesterday after readin dis article the wifey said,”Matt, i’m getting a weave…” now if de’s anyone in de world (other than khaya)who knws how i feel bout hair, it’s my wife… she was jokin ofcourse,but i remembered when my dislike for ‘fake’ hair turned to disgust and then back 2 jus dislike (i’m sitting on tolerate ryt now) Khaya borrowed me a book (which i have since ordered) called Black Beauty by Ben Arogondade.
    an intense view n history on black aesthetics. now dat i understand the history, i am content in saying, blak ppl will do a lot of ‘bad’ in ignorance and less ‘right’ out of perfect choice (no pun intended). if we only knew where it started n why we hate ourselves so much, “I am not my hair” would be turned to, “My hair IS because I AM.” The outer mirrors the inner.

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
  • Trevisto

    I also grew up with the mindset that natural hair is unfashionable, ugly,
    primitive and awkward, my sisters always had to relax their hair to look hot, so Nicky, I then thought long relaxed hair or weave is hot. but trust me I find Lira super hot!!

    I can’t stand the smell of Dark ‘n Lovely moisturiser, the grease. eeuw! the smell of blow dried weave!!

    I agree choose whatever that works for you, but I’m happy and proud because people like Pabi have change the mindsets that going bald and short natural hair means u can’t afford exotic hairstyles or you are not fashionable.

    Then the Bonangs, the Beyonces, the Tyra banks of this country can stop looking down on the Liras and Pabi Molois of this country.

    great article!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
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  • Bo

    I think I’ve done it all as far as hair goes and truth be told I’m really sick of weaves. I’ve done them all have since come to the realization that they’re a short term solution to a long term problem.I’m starting to find short hairdo’s really attractive (think Nikiwe Bikitjha from eNews,Wandi from Rythmn City,etc).In my opinion that kind of short hair creates a very mature,confident ‘you better take me seriously’ but also sexy kind of look..I absolutely love it!!!

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  • Kagiso ‘KG’

    1st & foremost, i love the article, Lerry, it got me really thinkin as to how i really see myself in relation to my hair vs how people see me in relation to my hair. I think wat im gettin here is that how other people view me or my hairstyle, should not affect my self-esteem. Thanks 🙂

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  • I agree Khaya that our choice of hairstyles is our own to make and one’s ‘right to self-determinism’ and that is all good and well.I also agree with the article in that there may be some hegemony surrounding the choice of hairstyles that (black) sistahs or even brothers opt for. I as a chick have seen how guys generally go for the girl with the long hair which -if the chick is black -happens to be a weave most of the time coz let’s face it black sistahs hair doesn’t grow to an incredible length and is not flouncy (even though we’d like to think that it is). So sometimes our choice of hairstlyle is not self-determined but determined rather by the pressures of our modern society.

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  • khaya

    The hair politics of black people’s are ones that i have particular interest in.for the longest time natural hair of black folk was percieved as a deflaut disaster that had to be civilised into a correct form and that is where the black consciousness movements were able to,through the growing of natural hair,give an alternative to what was the norm.we have come along way from those days and i would like to think that those who are said to be ‘selling out’ have a right of self determinism and their choices ought to be respected.we cant run away from the fact that our dress codes and hair dos are statements even if the said statements dont necessarily compliment or reflect our mind states or ideologies.thats the unfortunate part of doing things for the sake of doing because at times you may be quizzed of the meaning of what is hair seeks to communicate,if ever there is anything.your hair is yours and do as you see fit.

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